It’s time for another installment of my bi-weekly email series. In each issue, I share three resources that I have found to be helpful for myself and/or my clients. As a former librarian and a current voracious gatherer of helpful information, I’m constantly listening to podcasts, reading books and articles, and watching various videos that spark my interest.

Listening:

As I was driving to a memorial service for a friend this past weekend, I had time to listen to this whole fascinating podcast. Deeyah Khan is a woman who was afraid of terrorists and other dangerous men. She decided to confront her fears by interviewing the men who terrified her and making films about them. She went in committed to truly understanding them. What transpired was transformational. I’m posting this because I think we all have a lot to learn about what happens when we deliberately don’t include people in our communities, families, or other social groups. Do give it a listen. She actually left me hopeful that we can change the way we interact with people and thus lessen the possibility of hate and terrorism.

Reading:

I’m currently taking a writing class and my teacher read to us from Pablo Neruda’s “The Book of Questions.” I had never heard of this work before and I immediately went to the library and took it out. As coaches we are trained to be curious. These questions raise curiosity to a whole new level.

And what did the rubies say
standing before the juice of the pomegranates?

Why doesn’t Thursday talk itself
into coming after Friday?

Who shouted with glee
when the color blue was born?

Why does the earth grieve
when the violets appear?

Watching:

I was so moved by this video!

A foundational voice in end of life care, Frank Ostaseski, shares how his series of recent strokes and the sudden switch in roles from caregiver to care-receiver have deepened his understanding of the surprising ways vulnerability can unlock personal resilience and cultivate compassion for oneself and others. In his conversation with Courtney E. Martin, the Zen Hospice Project co-founder speaks about the loss of identity in the setting of illness and why he’s more interested in discovery, not recovery.

Thanks to Gail Moore for sharing this link.

Thanks for taking the time to read this newsletter. If any of these resources elicited any thoughts or feelings that you’d like to share with me, please contact me. If you like these emails, feel free to share them with other coaches, friends, clients and people walking the transformational path.

See you again in two weeks,
Judy